INTERIVEW WITH JOHANNE ON GRIOT MAGAZINE

THE MARCH OF WASHINGTON THROUGHT THE LENS OF ALESSANDRO RIZZI.

 

Going through the pages of Sculptures my tactile memory went all the way back in time and it felt like hearing my mother telling me “don’t put your fingers on the pictures because you’ll spoil them”. A recommendation that is well rooted in the habits of those who printed photos on paper, despite the coming of the digital dark age, almost fulfilling Vinton Cerf’s omen. A book, an instant book, portraying the story of the march on Washington and of the thousands of people gathering to protest against police violence after the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson (Hands Up, Don’t shoot) and Eric Garner in New York (I can’t breathe) through the lens of a European, Italian photographer, Alessandro Rizzi......

 

INTERVIEW:

GR: “Can a love extend until touching the deepest ropes bonding society? And can a personal story become the access to the heart of civil rights?” Two questions you asked yourself before leaving for Washington. In this project, with respect to your past works, for the first time you have worked on two levels: one is emotional and intimate, the other is social. Tell me all about it.


AR: Both in questions and answers the two levels are always intertwined. Questions were to me the keys of all the reasons that pushed me to leave, even if the emotional level has played a fundamental role.

GR: Why?

AR: From a conceptual point of view this project condenses in one day only – 8 hours – a huge work I made about myself, with the idea of what I could do and that I had to be honest to photograph something that...

 

THE INTERVIEW CONTINUE HERE